FISHERINV

The FISHERINV function in Excel is used to calculate the inverse Fisher transformation on a given value. This function is commonly applied in statistical analyses, particularly when working with correlation coefficients or other transformed data.

Syntax

=FISHERINV(Y)

Y The value for which you want to calculate the inverse Fisher transformation.

About FISHERINV

When embarking on statistical ventures and necessitating the reverse Fisher transformation for a specific value, turn to the FISHERINV function in Excel. This tool proves invaluable when seeking to revert transformed data back to its original state, offering insights into relationships among variables or correlation coefficients with enhanced interpretability and usability. By applying FISHERINV, you can elucidate the raw data's underlying patterns and relationships, unlocking comprehensive understanding and aiding in decision-making processes that rely on statistical insights.

Examples

Suppose you have a Fisher-transformed value of 0.732. To obtain the original data value, you can use the FISHERINV function as follows: =FISHERINV(0.732). This will return the initial value before the Fisher transformation was applied.

Consider a scenario where an originally calculated correlation coefficient was transformed using the Fisher transformation, resulting in a value of 1.929. To revert this transformed value back to the original correlation coefficient, you can employ the FISHERINV function: =FISHERINV(1.929). This action will yield the initial correlation coefficient before transformation.

Questions

What does the FISHERINV function do?

The FISHERINV function in Excel calculates the inverse Fisher transformation on a given value, allowing you to reverse the effects of the Fisher transformation and retrieve the original data value.

In what scenarios is the FISHERINV function commonly used?

The FISHERINV function is frequently utilized in statistical analyses, especially when working with correlation coefficients or other data that has undergone a Fisher transformation. It serves as a valuable tool in reverting transformed values to their initial states for enhanced interpretability and analysis.

Can the FISHERINV function handle non-numeric inputs?

No, the FISHERINV function requires a valid numerical input as the value for which you want to calculate the inverse Fisher transformation. Ensure that the provided value aligns with the nature of the Fisher transformation to obtain accurate results.

Related functions

FISHER