ACCRINT

The ACCRINT function is used to calculate the accrued interest for a security that pays periodic interest. This function is commonly used in financial analysis and accounting to calculate interest earned on bonds, notes, or other fixed income investments.

Syntax

=ACCRINT(Issue, Settlement, Rate, Par, [Basis], [Calc method])

Issue Date of the security's issue.
Settlement Date when the security was purchased.
Rate Annual coupon rate of the security.
Par The security's par value.
Basis (Optional) The day-count basis to use. Defaults to 0 if omitted.
Calc method (Optional) The method to use for calculating the accrued interest. Defaults to TRUE if omitted.

About ACCRINT

When delving into the realm of bonds and requiring a precise computation of accrued interest, turn to ACCRINT in Excel. It serves as a reliable tool for calculating the accumulation of interest on bonds, particularly beneficial for those navigating the intricacies of fixed-income securities.
To utilize ACCRINT effectively, you input specific details about the bond in question. This includes its inception date (issue date), the initiation of interest accrual (first interest payment date), and the date of transaction or settlement. Additionally, you provide the annual interest rate, the face value (nominal value), and the frequency of interest accrual (compounding periods per year).
An advantageous feature of ACCRINT lies in its adaptability. You have the option to customize aspects of the calculation. For instance, the [basis] parameter allows you to select a preferred day counting method from a range of options. Furthermore, the [calc_method] parameter enables you to choose between a full-period or prorated approach to interest computation.
ACCRINT excels in addressing the complexities associated with bonds featuring irregular interest accrual periods. It diligently performs the necessary calculations, offering a precise assessment of the accrued interest between the commencement and settlement dates.
In summary, ACCRINT stands as an invaluable resource in Excel when scrutinizing accrued interest on bonds. Consider it as your reliable financial companion, furnishing you with comprehensive insights into the incremental monetary value over time and ensuring informed decision-making in financial matters.

Examples

Suppose you have purchased a bond with a par value of $10,000, an annual coupon rate of 5%, and it pays interest semi-annually. The bond was issued on January 1, 2022, and you purchased it on March 1, 2022. You want to calculate the accrued interest on July 31, 2022. The ACCRINT formula would be:
=ACCRINT("01/01/2022", "01/01/2022", "03/01/2022", 0.05, 10000, 2)
This will return the accrued interest amount for the specified bond between March 1, 2022, and July 31, 2022.

Suppose you have a bond with a par value of $5,000, an annual coupon rate of 3%, and it pays interest quarterly. The bond was issued on October 1, 2021, and you purchased it on December 15, 2021. You want to calculate the accrued interest on February 28, 2022, using the actual/actual day-count basis. The ACCRINT formula would be:
=ACCRINT("10/1/2021", "10/1/2021", "12/15/2021", 0.03, 5000, 4, 1)
This will return the accrued interest amount for the specified bond between December 15, 2021, and February 28, 2022, using the actual/actual day-count basis.

Questions

How is the accrued interest calculated by the ACCRINT function?

The ACCRINT function calculates the accrued interest using the following formula:

Accrued Interest = (Rate * Par * Days) / (Frequency * Basis)

Can I use the ACCRINT function for securities with irregular payment dates?

No, the ACCRINT function assumes that the coupon payments are made on a regular schedule and do not have irregular payment dates. It is designed for securities with fixed coupon payment periods.

Can I specify a different day-count basis for the ACCRINT function?

Yes, you can specify a different day-count basis using the optional Basis argument. The default value is 0, which represents the 30/360 day-count basis. You can specify other day-count bases, such as actual/actual or actual/360, by providing the appropriate numeric code as the Basis argument.

Can I specify a different method for calculating accrued interest with the ACCRINT function?

Yes, you can specify a different method for calculating accrued interest using the optional Calc method argument. The default value is 0, which represents the US (NASD) 30/360 method. You can specify other methods, such as actual/actual or European 30/360, by providing the appropriate numeric code as the Calc method argument.

Related functions

ACCRINTM
COUPDAYS
COUPDAYSNC
COUPNCD
COUPNUM
COUPPCD
MDURATION
YIELD
YIELDDISC
YIELDMAT